RATES OF HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED CLOSTRIDIOIDES INFECTION DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC IN A TERTIARY HEALTHCARE SETTING
DDW ePoster Library. Hazel K. 05/21/21; 319649; Fr499
Dr. Karl Hazel
Dr. Karl Hazel
Contributions
Abstract

Number: Fr499
RATES OF HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED CLOSTRIDIOIDES INFECTION DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC IN A TERTIARY HEALTHCARE SETTING

Society: AGA
Track: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Category: Immunology‚ Microbiology & Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

Author(s): Karl Hazel1, Mairead Skally1, Emily Glynn1, Margaret Foley1, Karen Burns1, Aoibhlinn M. O'Toole1, Karen Boland1, Fidelma Fitzpatrick1,2,31 Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 2 Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland; 3 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Basel, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland

Background and Aim
Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhoea. High bed occupancy rates in acute hospitals correlate with an increased incidence of healthcare-associated CDI (HA-CDI). The COVID-19 pandemic led to changes within our healthcare system, including cessation of elective procedures and reduced presentations for non-COVID-19-related illnesses. Our aim was to determine if improved hand-hygiene, increased use of personal protective equipment (PPE), social distancing and reduced hospital occupancy observed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic also impacted on rates of HA-CDI.

Methods:
We defined the COVID-19 outbreak period as March to May 2020 and identified newly-acquired HA-CDI cases during the same periods in 2018, 2019 and 2020, using the hospital C. difficile database. HA-CDI was defined as per national case definitions. Electronic records were used to assess patient demographics and biochemical markers. Hospital antimicrobial consumption and hand-hygiene audit data for the study period and corresponding in 2018, 2019 and 2020 were collected. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA.

Results
Fifty patients with HA-CDI were identified. Chi-squared analysis with Yates correction demonstrated a decrease in newly-acquired HA-CDI during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic period when compared to the same period in 2018 and 2019 (p=0.029); (Table 1).

Conclusion
During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, static antimicrobial use, reduced hospital occupancy, improved hand hygiene and the use of PPE resulted in a decline in HA-CDI; demonstrating the importance of hospital activity and infection prevention and control measures on HA-CDI during an inpatient stay.

Number: Fr499
RATES OF HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED CLOSTRIDIOIDES INFECTION DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC IN A TERTIARY HEALTHCARE SETTING

Society: AGA
Track: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Category: Immunology‚ Microbiology & Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

Author(s): Karl Hazel1, Mairead Skally1, Emily Glynn1, Margaret Foley1, Karen Burns1, Aoibhlinn M. O'Toole1, Karen Boland1, Fidelma Fitzpatrick1,2,31 Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 2 Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland; 3 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Basel, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland

Background and Aim
Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhoea. High bed occupancy rates in acute hospitals correlate with an increased incidence of healthcare-associated CDI (HA-CDI). The COVID-19 pandemic led to changes within our healthcare system, including cessation of elective procedures and reduced presentations for non-COVID-19-related illnesses. Our aim was to determine if improved hand-hygiene, increased use of personal protective equipment (PPE), social distancing and reduced hospital occupancy observed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic also impacted on rates of HA-CDI.

Methods:
We defined the COVID-19 outbreak period as March to May 2020 and identified newly-acquired HA-CDI cases during the same periods in 2018, 2019 and 2020, using the hospital C. difficile database. HA-CDI was defined as per national case definitions. Electronic records were used to assess patient demographics and biochemical markers. Hospital antimicrobial consumption and hand-hygiene audit data for the study period and corresponding in 2018, 2019 and 2020 were collected. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA.

Results
Fifty patients with HA-CDI were identified. Chi-squared analysis with Yates correction demonstrated a decrease in newly-acquired HA-CDI during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic period when compared to the same period in 2018 and 2019 (p=0.029); (Table 1).

Conclusion
During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, static antimicrobial use, reduced hospital occupancy, improved hand hygiene and the use of PPE resulted in a decline in HA-CDI; demonstrating the importance of hospital activity and infection prevention and control measures on HA-CDI during an inpatient stay.

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies