IMPROVING INFLUENZA VACCINATION IN PEDIATRIC INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE: A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE
DDW ePoster Library. Rudra S. 05/22/21; 319818; Sa015
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Engage with the presenter here during ePoster Session: Advancing Clinical Practice: GI Fellow-Directed Quality Improvement Projects
On Saturday, May 22, 2021 12:15 - 1 p.m. EDT

Number: Sa015
IMPROVING INFLUENZA VACCINATION IN PEDIATRIC INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE: A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

Society: AGA
Track: Education and Training
Category: GI Fellow-Directed QI Session

Author(s): Sharmistha Rudra1, Andrew B. Grossman1, Maura Downing1, Jillian Hillman1, Kerry A. Ashcroft1, Anita Puma1, Jessica Breton11 The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Background: Vaccination rates remain low among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) despite guideline recommendations and evidence-based publications. Reported barriers include perceived lack of benefit, fear of side effects, and inconvenience. At our IBD center we follow approximately 1700 patients. During the 2019-2020 influenza season, our vaccination rate for the entire IBD population was 40.3% and 45.5% for those receiving biologic therapies at our infusion center (n=772).

We developed a quality improvement initiative to evaluate vaccination practices and to determine effective strategies to increase vaccine uptake. As a first-step, we targeted our most vulnerable and accessible population: patients receiving biologic infusions.

Methods: Our initiative began in August 2020. Plan-do-study-act cycles included creation of a multi-disciplinary team to review vaccination barriers and distribution of a survey to caregivers or IBD patients >=18 years to explore vaccination decision making process, awareness of recommendations, and impact of vaccine availability in the infusion center on uptake.

The next phase was optimizing access among patients receiving biologic therapies at our infusion center. The strategies we implemented included educational sessions with the division providers and infusion center nurses, creation of an Epic EMR order set, active phone screening of our population prior to infusion visits, at which point unvaccinated patients were offered the vaccine during the appointment.

Chi squared analysis compared survey responses between caregivers and patients. Two proportion sample test identified differences in vaccination rates between the two influenza seasons.

Results: The survey was answered by 14.4% (n=269 caregivers and n=60 patients), with 71.3% on either anti-TNF alpha (infliximab, adalimumab) or vedolizumab. Of respondents, 13.4% were unvaccinated in 2019-2020. Top reasons for non-vaccination included “unsure of safety” (31.8%), “unsure of benefit” (29.5%), and “forgot to schedule” (13.6%). Patients and caregivers had similar vaccine impressions, with no statistically significant differences (Figure 1). For the 2020-2021 season, 88.75% plan to get vaccinated and 51.7% expressed interest in receiving the vaccine during their infusion appointment.

Since implementing our initiative, the vaccination rate has already increased to 59.2% compared to 45.5% (p=0.001).

Conclusions: Our initiative increased vaccination rates in patients receiving biologic infusions by 13.7% thus far. Particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, the influenza vaccine is essential to protect this vulnerable population and decrease the burden on the healthcare system. We have identified pre-screening prior to appointments and providing access in conjunction to scheduled appointments as the most effective strategies to optimize vaccination uptake.
Engage with the presenter here during ePoster Session: Advancing Clinical Practice: GI Fellow-Directed Quality Improvement Projects
On Saturday, May 22, 2021 12:15 - 1 p.m. EDT

Number: Sa015
IMPROVING INFLUENZA VACCINATION IN PEDIATRIC INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE: A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

Society: AGA
Track: Education and Training
Category: GI Fellow-Directed QI Session

Author(s): Sharmistha Rudra1, Andrew B. Grossman1, Maura Downing1, Jillian Hillman1, Kerry A. Ashcroft1, Anita Puma1, Jessica Breton11 The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Background: Vaccination rates remain low among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) despite guideline recommendations and evidence-based publications. Reported barriers include perceived lack of benefit, fear of side effects, and inconvenience. At our IBD center we follow approximately 1700 patients. During the 2019-2020 influenza season, our vaccination rate for the entire IBD population was 40.3% and 45.5% for those receiving biologic therapies at our infusion center (n=772).

We developed a quality improvement initiative to evaluate vaccination practices and to determine effective strategies to increase vaccine uptake. As a first-step, we targeted our most vulnerable and accessible population: patients receiving biologic infusions.

Methods: Our initiative began in August 2020. Plan-do-study-act cycles included creation of a multi-disciplinary team to review vaccination barriers and distribution of a survey to caregivers or IBD patients >=18 years to explore vaccination decision making process, awareness of recommendations, and impact of vaccine availability in the infusion center on uptake.

The next phase was optimizing access among patients receiving biologic therapies at our infusion center. The strategies we implemented included educational sessions with the division providers and infusion center nurses, creation of an Epic EMR order set, active phone screening of our population prior to infusion visits, at which point unvaccinated patients were offered the vaccine during the appointment.

Chi squared analysis compared survey responses between caregivers and patients. Two proportion sample test identified differences in vaccination rates between the two influenza seasons.

Results: The survey was answered by 14.4% (n=269 caregivers and n=60 patients), with 71.3% on either anti-TNF alpha (infliximab, adalimumab) or vedolizumab. Of respondents, 13.4% were unvaccinated in 2019-2020. Top reasons for non-vaccination included “unsure of safety” (31.8%), “unsure of benefit” (29.5%), and “forgot to schedule” (13.6%). Patients and caregivers had similar vaccine impressions, with no statistically significant differences (Figure 1). For the 2020-2021 season, 88.75% plan to get vaccinated and 51.7% expressed interest in receiving the vaccine during their infusion appointment.

Since implementing our initiative, the vaccination rate has already increased to 59.2% compared to 45.5% (p=0.001).

Conclusions: Our initiative increased vaccination rates in patients receiving biologic infusions by 13.7% thus far. Particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, the influenza vaccine is essential to protect this vulnerable population and decrease the burden on the healthcare system. We have identified pre-screening prior to appointments and providing access in conjunction to scheduled appointments as the most effective strategies to optimize vaccination uptake.
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