BURDEN OF FATIGUE AMONG CROHN'S DISEASE AND ULCERATIVE COLITIS PATIENTS: ANALYSES FROM A GLOBAL SURVEY OF PATIENTS AND GASTROENTEROLOGISTS
DDW ePoster Library. Regueiro M. 05/22/21; 319883; Sa080
Dr. Miguel Regueiro
Dr. Miguel Regueiro
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Abstract
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Number: Sa080
BURDEN OF FATIGUE AMONG CROHN'S DISEASE AND ULCERATIVE COLITIS PATIENTS: ANALYSES FROM A GLOBAL SURVEY OF PATIENTS AND GASTROENTEROLOGISTS

Society: AGA
Track: Clinical Practice
Category: Clinical Practice

Author(s): Miguel D. Regueiro2, Theresa Hunter1, Rina Lukanova3, Mingyang Shan1, April N. Naegeli11 Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States; 2 Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States; 3 Adelphi Real World, Bollington, Cheshire East, United Kingdom

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of fatigue among Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and to evaluate the association of fatigue with disease activity and patient-reported outcomes (PROs).
Methods: Data from a cross-sectional survey conducted with gastroenterologists and their consulting adult CD and UC patients in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and the United States were analyzed. Data were collected in 2017-2018 via gastroenterologist-completed patient record forms and patient-self completed forms. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, disease activity, and medication use were reported by the gastroenterologist, while current symptoms (fatigue, rectal urgency, abdominal pain, sleep disturbance), work productivity, and the Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (SIBDQ) were reported by the patient. All analyses were conducted for CD and UC patients separately. Demographics, clinical characteristics, disease activity, symptoms, and PROs were compared between patients with fatigue and patients without fatigue using parametric tests and non-parametric tests where appropriate. All statistical tests performed were two-sided with a significance level of α= 0.05.
Results: Data from 1,228 CD patients and 1,057 UC patients were included in this analysis. Fatigue was reported in 26.0% (n=320) of CD patients and 22.6% (n=239) of UC patients. CD patients with fatigue were more likely to be female (p=0.0193), unemployed (p=0.0069), have moderate/severe disease (p<0.0001), and have a higher mean CDAI score (p<0.0001) compared to CD patients without fatigue (Table 1). UC patients with fatigue were more likely to be unemployed (p=0.0149), have moderate/severe disease (p=0.0001), and have a higher Mayo score (p<0.0001) compared to UC patients without fatigue (Table 2). CD and UC patients with fatigue were more likely to have rectal urgency, abdominal pain, a higher mean level of pain, and a higher mean level of sleep disturbance than patients without fatigue (all p<0.001). CD and UC patients with fatigue also had lower SIBDQ scores (CD and UC: p<0.0001) and more work impairment (CD: p=0.0015; UC: p=0.0170) than patients without fatigue. CD and UC patients with fatigue were more likely to be receiving corticosteroids (CD: p=0.0008; UC: p=0.0051) and biologics (CD: p<0.0001; UC: p=0.0084) than patients without fatigue.
Conclusion: Fatigue is a common symptom among CD and UC patients and is associated with higher levels of disease activity, decreased work productivity, and worse quality of life.

Number: Sa080
BURDEN OF FATIGUE AMONG CROHN'S DISEASE AND ULCERATIVE COLITIS PATIENTS: ANALYSES FROM A GLOBAL SURVEY OF PATIENTS AND GASTROENTEROLOGISTS

Society: AGA
Track: Clinical Practice
Category: Clinical Practice

Author(s): Miguel D. Regueiro2, Theresa Hunter1, Rina Lukanova3, Mingyang Shan1, April N. Naegeli11 Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States; 2 Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States; 3 Adelphi Real World, Bollington, Cheshire East, United Kingdom

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of fatigue among Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and to evaluate the association of fatigue with disease activity and patient-reported outcomes (PROs).
Methods: Data from a cross-sectional survey conducted with gastroenterologists and their consulting adult CD and UC patients in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and the United States were analyzed. Data were collected in 2017-2018 via gastroenterologist-completed patient record forms and patient-self completed forms. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, disease activity, and medication use were reported by the gastroenterologist, while current symptoms (fatigue, rectal urgency, abdominal pain, sleep disturbance), work productivity, and the Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (SIBDQ) were reported by the patient. All analyses were conducted for CD and UC patients separately. Demographics, clinical characteristics, disease activity, symptoms, and PROs were compared between patients with fatigue and patients without fatigue using parametric tests and non-parametric tests where appropriate. All statistical tests performed were two-sided with a significance level of α= 0.05.
Results: Data from 1,228 CD patients and 1,057 UC patients were included in this analysis. Fatigue was reported in 26.0% (n=320) of CD patients and 22.6% (n=239) of UC patients. CD patients with fatigue were more likely to be female (p=0.0193), unemployed (p=0.0069), have moderate/severe disease (p<0.0001), and have a higher mean CDAI score (p<0.0001) compared to CD patients without fatigue (Table 1). UC patients with fatigue were more likely to be unemployed (p=0.0149), have moderate/severe disease (p=0.0001), and have a higher Mayo score (p<0.0001) compared to UC patients without fatigue (Table 2). CD and UC patients with fatigue were more likely to have rectal urgency, abdominal pain, a higher mean level of pain, and a higher mean level of sleep disturbance than patients without fatigue (all p<0.001). CD and UC patients with fatigue also had lower SIBDQ scores (CD and UC: p<0.0001) and more work impairment (CD: p=0.0015; UC: p=0.0170) than patients without fatigue. CD and UC patients with fatigue were more likely to be receiving corticosteroids (CD: p=0.0008; UC: p=0.0051) and biologics (CD: p<0.0001; UC: p=0.0084) than patients without fatigue.
Conclusion: Fatigue is a common symptom among CD and UC patients and is associated with higher levels of disease activity, decreased work productivity, and worse quality of life.
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