SPECIFIC EPIDEMIOLOGIC FACTORS CORRELATE WITH HIGHER DEGREE OF HEPATIC FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C (CHC)
DDW ePoster Library. Medina Rojas M. 05/22/21; 320123; Sa320
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Engage with the presenter here during ePoster Session: Hepatitis C
On Saturday, May 22, 2021 12:15 - 1 p.m. EDT

Number: Sa320
SPECIFIC EPIDEMIOLOGIC FACTORS CORRELATE WITH HIGHER DEGREE OF HEPATIC FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C (CHC)

Society: AASLD
Track: Liver Diseases and Transplantation
Category: Hepatitis C

Author(s): Maria T. Medina1, Ambreen I. Ahmed3, Quynh-An N. Phan1, Natalie N. Nguyen2, Ana L. Romero1, Jesus E. Romero1, Javier Sanchez1,4, Chukwuma Egwim1,5, Victor Ankoma-Sey1,51 Liver Associates of Texas, P.A., Pearland, Texas, United States; 2 Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States; 3 Lincoln Memorial University DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, Harrogate, Tennessee, United States; 4 Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States; 5 Sherrie and Alan Conover Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation; JC Walter Jr Transplant Center; Weill Cornell Medical College; Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, United States

Background: Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a chronic liver disease that has a prevalence of 3-4% in the US. Previous studies have identified a number of risk factors associated with progressive disease. With the recent surge in new HCV infection among young adults, redefining epidemiological factors associated with advanced fibrosis may need to be reevaluated. The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of epidemiologic factors as predictors of fibrosis in patients with CHC.
Methods: A retrospective study was performed at Liver Associates of Texas, P.A. a hepatology practice in Houston, TX for all patients diagnosed with CHC from 09/2018-11/2020. BMI and gender were recorded. Patients with a BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 were identified as obese. Liver stiffness measurements (kPa) from transient elastography (Fibroscan), as well as FAST scores were used as markers for fibrosis. A multivariate linear regression model was used to determine the correlations of patient characteristics in relation to kPa and FAST scores. Significance was established with p<0.05.
Results: 198 patients were included in the study. Patients were 60.8 ± 11.9 years old. 54.3% were male, 35% Caucasian, 25.4% African American, 8.6% Hispanic, 3.5% Asian, 27.4% unspecified. The average BMI and liver stiffness by kPa were 29.1 kg/m2 and 13.1, respectively. When controlling for only gender in the sample population, male patients showed a correlation with a higher degree of fibrosis by kPa (β = 4.78, p<0.04, CI: 0.19 to 9.372). However, when controlling for gender and BMI in all patients, male and obese patients showed a correlation with a higher degree of fibrosis by FAST scores; for male gender). See tables 1 and 2.
Conclusion: Our study found a significant correlation between male gender and advanced fibrosis. Additionally, male gender or a high BMI are both correlated with a higher FAST score. These finding may facilitate early detection and monitoring of CHC patients who are at higher susceptibility of advanced liver fibrosis, especially in the primary care setting.
Engage with the presenter here during ePoster Session: Hepatitis C
On Saturday, May 22, 2021 12:15 - 1 p.m. EDT

Number: Sa320
SPECIFIC EPIDEMIOLOGIC FACTORS CORRELATE WITH HIGHER DEGREE OF HEPATIC FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C (CHC)

Society: AASLD
Track: Liver Diseases and Transplantation
Category: Hepatitis C

Author(s): Maria T. Medina1, Ambreen I. Ahmed3, Quynh-An N. Phan1, Natalie N. Nguyen2, Ana L. Romero1, Jesus E. Romero1, Javier Sanchez1,4, Chukwuma Egwim1,5, Victor Ankoma-Sey1,51 Liver Associates of Texas, P.A., Pearland, Texas, United States; 2 Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States; 3 Lincoln Memorial University DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, Harrogate, Tennessee, United States; 4 Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States; 5 Sherrie and Alan Conover Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation; JC Walter Jr Transplant Center; Weill Cornell Medical College; Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, United States

Background: Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a chronic liver disease that has a prevalence of 3-4% in the US. Previous studies have identified a number of risk factors associated with progressive disease. With the recent surge in new HCV infection among young adults, redefining epidemiological factors associated with advanced fibrosis may need to be reevaluated. The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of epidemiologic factors as predictors of fibrosis in patients with CHC.
Methods: A retrospective study was performed at Liver Associates of Texas, P.A. a hepatology practice in Houston, TX for all patients diagnosed with CHC from 09/2018-11/2020. BMI and gender were recorded. Patients with a BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 were identified as obese. Liver stiffness measurements (kPa) from transient elastography (Fibroscan), as well as FAST scores were used as markers for fibrosis. A multivariate linear regression model was used to determine the correlations of patient characteristics in relation to kPa and FAST scores. Significance was established with p<0.05.
Results: 198 patients were included in the study. Patients were 60.8 ± 11.9 years old. 54.3% were male, 35% Caucasian, 25.4% African American, 8.6% Hispanic, 3.5% Asian, 27.4% unspecified. The average BMI and liver stiffness by kPa were 29.1 kg/m2 and 13.1, respectively. When controlling for only gender in the sample population, male patients showed a correlation with a higher degree of fibrosis by kPa (β = 4.78, p<0.04, CI: 0.19 to 9.372). However, when controlling for gender and BMI in all patients, male and obese patients showed a correlation with a higher degree of fibrosis by FAST scores; for male gender). See tables 1 and 2.
Conclusion: Our study found a significant correlation between male gender and advanced fibrosis. Additionally, male gender or a high BMI are both correlated with a higher FAST score. These finding may facilitate early detection and monitoring of CHC patients who are at higher susceptibility of advanced liver fibrosis, especially in the primary care setting.
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies